Friday, July 28, 2006

the embodied brain

People often ask me what I teach. I teach people to understand thinking as the process of an embodied brain. Their minds are what happens when their bodies and brains work seamlessly together.

Why is this useful? How often have you had "a feeling" you should make a particular decision or turn in one direction instead of another? You knew that one choice meant not having other choices, that it would have an impact. Maybe you went with your feeling, or maybe you talked yourself out of it.

There is a growing amount of science that suggests our brains depend on our bodies in order to function optimally. Information flows between brain and body in an endless stream, and that stream provides the flexible, dynamic response necessary to keep us functioning in a world of continuous change. When we understand that thinking involves our whole selves - not just a small section of the brain - we change the way we make choices. We become more responsive, more engaged, and more precise in our interaction with the rest of the world.

If you had access to more of the best thinking more of the time, would you take it? You do have access to more of your own best thinking. You can recognize the interaction of mind and body that produces that best thinking and the most effective action.

That's what I teach.

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