Friday, May 31, 2013

What do you absolutely know you want and how are you showing the world you want it?

I struggle with this question almost daily.  Because of the work I do, I know that what I really want is defined as much by what I actually do with my days as it is by how I answer questions about what I want.  Today I wanted to write. I also really wanted to spend time with my kid.  I know that because I made him breakfast, did some errands, drove him home to Hamilton and then took him out for lunch. Now I'm working on work: but I'm okay with that because I know that I do really want to get my next book written and that goal fits into a bigger picture when I am grateful for time with my kids whenever it becomes available.

In my business, I feel that I should have clearer goals and plans. The truth is: my goals are clear in the way I work. I want every person I train to think better and to become curious about how much better they could be in their thinking and their results. This shows up often in my interactions with clients: and sometimes I  remember to serve this purpose in a way that allows me to be paid for my work. It's clear to everyone (even me) that while I do believe that I provide value and that people need to pay for that value, in any given moment my bigger purpose is to get people thinking in ways that feel good to them and have positive results in the world. At the end of the day, if that's happened, I feel good about my work even if I am left with worries about building the business.

On the whole, I know that I am on purpose when I am teaching people who are understanding and using what I teach. I work on developing ways to find more of those people so that I can do my real work more and my business support work less. But that's a secondary purpose and if I tinker too much with my commitment to my primary purpose, I wonder if I'll like the results. It's a matter of balance: if I don't do the chores, I can't do the real work. If I become more committed to the chores and less to the real work, then I could build something that is externally successful but not satisfying.

We all know it's sometimes hard to walk our talk. It's equally hard to talk our walk: to know what we are doing in a way that allows us to put the goals and values we are living into words.


No comments: